ilovemy4c-hair
dynastylnoire:

raresenses:

dynastylnoire:

crystalitesummerstar:

dynastylnoire:

afrodyke:

justlizthoughts:

So you know how people like to make it seem like Black people have no buying power. Well, if you stroll through the hair aisle in Target you’ll find a plethora of products made for our hair in mind. I remember when I first went natural the only okay product I could find at Target was Giovanni Direct Leave-in.
I know it may seem a little far-fetched because it is after all just hair products. But considering the fact that most Black women are still relaxing their hair (I’m not judging, just look flawless) I think this speaks volumes of our buying potential.

yeah, we have a large buying power, but the products being made for us are not created by us. Or at least the ones being made by us are not sold in a large volume.
What does it mean when Clariol, a producer of relaxer, is now selling products for natural hair?

The biggest indicator for me was when suddenly Pantene, Suave and all the other notably white hair care companies began to make products with out sulfates and other chemicals that black hair blogs are none to report that we should not put in our hair. 
It was a clever move in that these new shampoos/conditioners they are making don’t say “black hair care” and therefore appeal to whites that want to ride the latest hair care craze without really knowing why it’s a important (I.E all the different exotic oil shampoos that come out every year) . It also can get the attention of black people with natural hair that are specifically looking for  ___free products without the shampoo/conditioner being thrown in the “black hair care aisle”

But seriously, we need to think about deeply. We spend over 8 billion dollars on this industry, yet only 3% comes back to us and that’s a serious problem. Seeing these larger companies prove how much power we have in the economy yet also show a sign of them pushing us out of the money making side of things. We seriously need to get our shit together and have the natural hair industry on lock by making it almost entirely black owned or literally every other ethic group is gonna be rolling to the bank except for us yet again.

How do we do that?
I ask in all honesty because I don’t know how to even begin to do something like that.
Also the prices that are reflected in those black owned products are not what their target market can afford.
I buy carol’s daughter and shae moisture but I ration how I use it because I can’t afford to spritz as much as my hair may need it. It’s definitely a “treat” for my hair when you consider the things our hair needs can be found in the baking aisle of most organic grocery stores.
If we are going to talk about us getting our shit together as black business people, we seriously have to examine why it’s okay for hair grease to be 15 dollars or a crop top 40 dollars since black people are selling it?
How can we support black businesses if we can’t afford their products?

^^^^ Oh my god, thank you for saying this! I’m glad we’re even having this conversation! It angers me to no end that Black-owned beauty companies sell their products for outrageous prices. Like, we are trying to support your endeavors, so why TF are you committing highway robbery with these prices? It’s a great example for class-discrimination within our ethnic group here. And I can’t say that I will ever break my bank to support Black-owned companies that are seemingly committed to ripping us off, when we just want to take care of our unique hair.
The only company so far that I patronize is owned by a Black woman in Ohio, her business is whipped goods, and I totally recommend all her stuff. Still not that price-friendly but it’s WAY more affordable than Carol’s Daughter. Hope I helped somebody.

good looking out sis
eta: her prices are the same as Carols. :/


I think an important thing to remember is that some small businesses need to mark up in order to make a profit. My mother owns a beauty supply store in Baltimore. She tries to keep her prices competitive with other hair supply stores that may be near her location. At the same time, if she the items that she buys wholesale don’t sell for a certain amount, then she won’t make any profit. And honestly the point of business is to make a profit. Maybe that’s not everyone’s goal but I want to say that’s the goal for the majority of business owners. This just goes back to the idea that if I’m a business owner that is using MY OWN MONEY to acquire products (because I was denied a loan) then there needs to be some kind of mark up because this is then cutting into my livelihood.

dynastylnoire:

raresenses:

dynastylnoire:

crystalitesummerstar:

dynastylnoire:

afrodyke:

justlizthoughts:

So you know how people like to make it seem like Black people have no buying power. Well, if you stroll through the hair aisle in Target you’ll find a plethora of products made for our hair in mind. I remember when I first went natural the only okay product I could find at Target was Giovanni Direct Leave-in.

I know it may seem a little far-fetched because it is after all just hair products. But considering the fact that most Black women are still relaxing their hair (I’m not judging, just look flawless) I think this speaks volumes of our buying potential.

yeah, we have a large buying power, but the products being made for us are not created by us. Or at least the ones being made by us are not sold in a large volume.

What does it mean when Clariol, a producer of relaxer, is now selling products for natural hair?

The biggest indicator for me was when suddenly Pantene, Suave and all the other notably white hair care companies began to make products with out sulfates and other chemicals that black hair blogs are none to report that we should not put in our hair.

It was a clever move in that these new shampoos/conditioners they are making don’t say “black hair care” and therefore appeal to whites that want to ride the latest hair care craze without really knowing why it’s a important (I.E all the different exotic oil shampoos that come out every year) . It also can get the attention of black people with natural hair that are specifically looking for  ___free products without the shampoo/conditioner being thrown in the “black hair care aisle”

But seriously, we need to think about deeply. We spend over 8 billion dollars on this industry, yet only 3% comes back to us and that’s a serious problem. Seeing these larger companies prove how much power we have in the economy yet also show a sign of them pushing us out of the money making side of things. We seriously need to get our shit together and have the natural hair industry on lock by making it almost entirely black owned or literally every other ethic group is gonna be rolling to the bank except for us yet again.

How do we do that?

I ask in all honesty because I don’t know how to even begin to do something like that.

Also the prices that are reflected in those black owned products are not what their target market can afford.

I buy carol’s daughter and shae moisture but I ration how I use it because I can’t afford to spritz as much as my hair may need it. It’s definitely a “treat” for my hair when you consider the things our hair needs can be found in the baking aisle of most organic grocery stores.

If we are going to talk about us getting our shit together as black business people, we seriously have to examine why it’s okay for hair grease to be 15 dollars or a crop top 40 dollars since black people are selling it?


How can we support black businesses if we can’t afford their products?

^^^^ Oh my god, thank you for saying this! I’m glad we’re even having this conversation! 

It angers me to no end that Black-owned beauty companies sell their products for outrageous prices. Like, we are trying to support your endeavors, so why TF are you committing highway robbery with these prices? It’s a great example for class-discrimination within our ethnic group here. And I can’t say that I will ever break my bank to support Black-owned companies that are seemingly committed to ripping us off, when we just want to take care of our unique hair.


The only company so far that I patronize is owned by a Black woman in Ohio, her business is whipped goods, and I totally recommend all her stuff. Still not that price-friendly but it’s WAY more affordable than Carol’s Daughter. Hope I helped somebody.

good looking out sis

eta: her prices are the same as Carols. :/

I think an important thing to remember is that some small businesses need to mark up in order to make a profit. My mother owns a beauty supply store in Baltimore. She tries to keep her prices competitive with other hair supply stores that may be near her location.

At the same time, if she the items that she buys wholesale don’t sell for a certain amount, then she won’t make any profit. And honestly the point of business is to make a profit. Maybe that’s not everyone’s goal but I want to say that’s the goal for the majority of business owners.

This just goes back to the idea that if I’m a business owner that is using MY OWN MONEY to acquire products (because I was denied a loan) then there needs to be some kind of mark up because this is then cutting into my livelihood.

stylish-dreaming
  • Me 50% of the time: I love to run. Green beans are amazing. Who needs cake when I can have strawberries. PROTEIN. Oh my god peanut butter. I have so much energy! This is my fourth bottle of water today. I love being healthy.
  • Me the other 50% of the time: I want to sleep for 6 years. When did my bed become heaven. Why did I eat 3 twinkies. I'm too lazy to put on a bra. Being a girl sucks. I don't feel like exercising.